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need help writing a resume?

Posted in Babysitting on 10th June 2014

need help writing a resume?
i have never written one. So please can anyone help me?
I have little work experience such as tutoring and babysitting.
I am trying to get a job as a customer service agent in an air port.
should i write a summary or an objective?
And how should i write it?
also i went to college and dropped out so should i write that on my resume or not?

Best answer(s):

Answer by emiyly watson
hey see www.moneyjobz.com
for this.
you’ll see the links specificly about this on the left and the right side so you dont have to go and search everywhere
Source(s):
searched and visited personally.

Answer by 55mac24
Never include you dropped out. Also say strength like I’m good working with people ,I’m a team player, I enjoy so and so etc. you want to include phone number name e-mail and address. Include master’s degree bachelors degree anything that makes you feel good about your self. Don’t lie on your resume if they find out they will most definitely not give you the job. Also try getting a good report from a teacher.

Answer by todd_b_52
Sounds like your resume is already filling up. Yes, include tutoring and babysitting as past jobs and do mention college. There are several good websites out there that have great formats and tips. Also, to make yourself stand out, include a cover letter. You don’t have to actually mail this, but find the hiring official’s email and email it as a .pdf file so it looks more professional. Be sure to have some family/friends review it for some extra feedback. Check out this sites:

http://www.quintcareers.com/resume_samples.html
http://www.quintcareers.com/cover_letter_samples.html

Answer by Rocconisse
Generally, resumes go like this:
Centered at the top:

Your name
Address
Phone number
email address

“Summary of Qualifications”
Yes, do write a short paragraph that basically sells you as a great person and employee. You want to briefly summarize your good qualities, experience and education. Aim it towards the job you’re applying for; for this one you’ll want to list qualities and experiences that would make you a great customer service agent in an airport, like knowledge of travel and computer systems, patience under pressure, flexibility in scheduling, willingness to work odd hours, etc. Since you don’t have many “concrete” qualifications, this really needs to be well-written!

“Work Experience”

Use bullet points or a short paragraph to give the places you worked, the starting and end dates and your dutes. Example: “Double Dip Deli, waitress/cashier/cook Aug. ’09 – Jan. ’10” Sometimes if a job was really puny, you shouldn’t list it, as it’s better to look like you’ve not worked due to school or whatever versus worked pathetic jobs or worked a really short time at them. Use “nanny” instead of “babysitting” if you have to list SOMETHING.

“Education”

Use bullet points or a short paragraph to list your school qualifications. Mention any classes or certifications that relate directly to your job. Put down your high school first, if you’ve not got much else in the way of qualifications. Yes, you should mention you’ve taken some college classes; you can put “attended UW ____” and the dates. You don’t have to mention you dropped out; the end dates of your college time will indicate that for you. And never say it in an interview; you haven’t “dropped out,” you are reorganizing your priorities, taking time off, switched your focus, decided you’d rather be challenged through work, etc b.s. phrases. Dropped out = bad.

“Volunteer Work, Activities & Interests”

Same deal, different topic. If you aren’t volunteering now, DO IT! You’re not working anyway, so you have time, and it really adds value to a weak resume. Try the local library, animal shelter, food pantry, school, senior center, etc. Tip: they want volunteers who will commit to a few hours a week for several months; showing up once randomly is more a nuisance than a help.

“References”

This is a list of people who are willing to be contacted by your possible employers. They’re also willing to talk about how professional, caring, hard-working, etc you are. These should NOT be family members. Teachers, possibly your priest, previous employers, volunteer organization coordinators, mentors and professional contacts make good references. Make sure you have their permission before listing them!! Give their full name, phone number and a brief description of their role in your life (i.e. “Previous manager and mentor”)

You’re done! Print on good quality paper, NEVER have typos, grammar errors or uncapitalized pronouns and submit it everywhere you can think of attached to the job’s application.

Answer by T
If you you have little or no resume-writing experience, and if you’re competing with other applicants, you should consider getting your resume done by a resume writing service. There are quite a few. Best (and cheapest) one I know is http://www.flatrateresumes.com

what do i need to know b4 going into a child custody hearing?

Posted in Child Support on 3rd April 2014

what do i need to know b4 going into a child custody hearing?
any help will be greatly appresciated.
its last minute

its on monday help!!!!

Best answer(s):

Answer by Rebekah K
If it is an initial determination, they will compare the home environments of both patents and try to make the best call they can for the kids. With young kids, most judges have a bias in favor of mothers. With older kids, the kid’s wishes are often taken into account.

If it is a change of custody, the side asking for the change will have to prove a change in circumstances. If it is an emergency hearing they will have to prove that the child is in imminent danger.

A list of some things courts will consider dangerous to a child that you might not have thought of:
Living with your boyfriend or girlfriend, or having them sleep over when the kids are home.
Any amount of drug use in the home no matter how minor.
A home that is always a mess.
More kids than bedrooms for them, especially if boys and girls are in the same room.

Answer by wazzupp3
1)prove you can support the kid/kids without the other parents help. You’ll look very weak if you mention the words “child support” “alimony” or “help”
2)Show the judge respect, but don’t suck-up.
3)Leave the children at home. Judges consider children at custody cases very inappropriate.
4)Being nervous is OK, but “balling” in front of the court shows lack of self-control over emotions
5)Do not talk to the judge/court unless spoken to
6)Show no signs of weakness by arguing with the other parent in the courtroom
7)Go to the bathroom before the proceedings 🙂
Good Luck!!

need single mother grant?

Posted in Working Mothers on 24th March 2014

need single mother grant?
im a single mother of a 3 year old n i have some health problems that hold me back from working i need money asap anyone know a grant or loan for single mothers thanks

Best answer(s):

Answer by A Hunch
We have no idea about your situations (is the children’s father(s) a deadbeat, did he die without insurance, we don’t know). We also don’t know what your situation is – do you truly have an illness that you can’t work or do you make more than it is and you don’t work?

Whatever your situation is, why would you think you are eligible for special circumstances because you are a “single mother”? Many people are having tough times and you are eligible for the same services that they are, but there is no grant for “single mothers”.